2.6.09, Mark 10:13-16

Posted on February 6, 2009


The Little Children and Jesus

13 People were bringing little children to Jesus to have him touch them, but the disciples rebuked them. 14 When Jesus saw this, he was indignant. He said to them, “Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of God belongs to such as these. 15 I tell you the truth, anyone who will not receive the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it.” 16 And he took the children in his arms, put his hands on them and blessed them.

The Family Man

That word “indignant” that we find in verse 14 is used several times in the New Testament, but mostly in reference to the disciples.  For instance, when the woman pours expensive perfume on the feet of Jesus, the disciples were indignant because of the wastefulness.  They are indignant quite a few times in the gospel accounts, usually because they feel morally outraged.

But Jesus is “indignant” only once – here in this passage.  When the disciples prevent children from drawing near to him and rebuke them instead, he becomes indignant – outraged with their behavior.  And even after this indignation, we see a tenderness and joy displayed with the children, as he lays his hands upon them and kisses them, just like a father would do…obviously Jesus treasures children.

A few things we can take away from this – first, a warning of types that I feel more and more compelled to make.  Often, we feel that it is required for us to get married and have children.  After all, we read about Adam and Eve in Genesis, and this passage about children – surely it is God’s will for all of us to go down this path!  Not necessarily.  Earthly marriage is a shadow, a metaphor, for the intimacy of our relationship with Christ.  And the passage above indicates that we should treasure children…not necessarily have them ourselves.  Please be careful that you don’t mix up cultural values and Christian values, and impose them upon yourself, or upon others.

Secondly…invest in the life of younger people, someway, somehow.  There are tutoring programs like ULC or Little Lights.  There are youth groups across this state.  There may be a young cousin or nephew that you have .  But Jesus treasures the young, and so should we.  And in children, we catch a glimpse of the kind of heart we should have as well, a heart that openly and joyfully runs to our Heavenly Father – I guarantee that if you invest in a younger person, you will get more out of it than you receive…

Questions

1. Have you ever believed that it is God’s will for every person to get married and have kids?  Where do you think this belief came from?

2. Have you ever considered that God’s will for your life may NOT be marriage and children?  Why is that such a difficult concept to even consider?

3. Have you ever served young people/children in the past?  What was that experience like?

4. What are some ways you can invest in youth this season?

Advertisements
Posted in: Uncategorized
4 Responses “2.6.09, Mark 10:13-16” →
  1. I’ve heard it said that usually if you have a desire to get married, it’s not God’s will for you to be single. However, my question is, what about those people who want to get married but cannot find a suitable spouse? If you can’t find a spouse, does it mean God doesn’t want you to get married? Or does it mean that you should just look harder? In general, how do people know when they are called to singleness?


  2. peterwchin

    February 8, 2009

    i think that “desire=God’s will” equation is far, far too simplistic. so the first step is to realize that the situation is way too difficult and personal to apply with a broad brush. it’s probably best to throw away platitudes when it comes to this issue.

    one of the compounding problems in this situation is also that our culture makes it feel like EVERYONE has to get married – it comes from our parents, from movies, from TV, from nearly every source imaginable. so it is very difficult to distinguish between wanting to get married because that’s God’s plan, and simply wanting to get married because that’s what you see and hear all day.

    i think the first step to identifying the calling to singleness may be simply…to recognize that singleness is okay! for many people they have never even considered it…or else they joke around about celibacy being a “gift”. once that idea takes root, then a person can more clearly discern if that is the way God has made them, but that first step of acceptance of singleness as an idea is a truly important one…


  3. chomomma

    February 9, 2009

    Doesn’t it state in scripture, that “It is not good that the man should be alone; I will make him an help meet for him” (Gen. 2:18).

    I’m not sure exactly what to interpret it as, but it could easily be construed that God wants all of us to get married. But I have a hard time thinking EVERYONE is called to get married… almost sounds monistic and unfeasible. Perhaps, we all are called to get married but many don’t marry the right people or meet the right person. As much as I am a proponent of everyone getting married, there are just many circumstances where people just aren’t in the environment to get married or have children. But maybe I’m thinking inside the box, and there is always someone for everyone no matter the situation or environment.

    In my case, I’ve seen the blessings that come with single life, but at the same time I feel like I won’t be complete without a family and be put in a situation where love is unconditional (like Jesus’s love for me)


  4. peterwchin

    February 9, 2009

    you can’t create a complete theology of marriage simply from the genesis account, unfortunately. the garden is far too distant and unknown to do that. you have to take into account what Jesus teaches in the gospels, that there are no man and wives in heaven, and what paul teaches in 1 corinthians, that it’s better for a person to remain unmarried so they can live for God alone.

    each person has to judge for their own situation, whether they are called to be married and just haven’t found the right person, or perhaps that is not God’s will for their lives. but it is important that they know that either choice is perfectly acceptable as both could be God’s will…

    lastly, it’s not good to look for unconditional love from family — even the best families will constantly fail in that regard. true unconditional love only comes from God, as we learn in the next devotional, and families are to imitate that love. in other words, you already have unconditional love…even without your own family!

2.6.09, Mark 10:13-16

Posted on February 6, 2009


The Little Children and Jesus

13 People were bringing little children to Jesus to have him touch them, but the disciples rebuked them. 14 When Jesus saw this, he was indignant. He said to them, “Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of God belongs to such as these. 15 I tell you the truth, anyone who will not receive the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it.” 16 And he took the children in his arms, put his hands on them and blessed them.

The Family Man

That word “indignant” that we find in verse 14 is used several times in the New Testament, but mostly in reference to the disciples.  For instance, when the woman pours expensive perfume on the feet of Jesus, the disciples were indignant because of the wastefulness.  They are indignant quite a few times in the gospel accounts, usually because they feel morally outraged.

But Jesus is “indignant” only once – here in this passage.  When the disciples prevent children from drawing near to him and rebuke them instead, he becomes indignant – outraged with their behavior.  And even after this indignation, we see a tenderness and joy displayed with the children, as he lays his hands upon them and kisses them, just like a father would do…obviously Jesus treasures children.

A few things we can take away from this – first, a warning of types that I feel more and more compelled to make.  Often, we feel that it is required for us to get married and have children.  After all, we read about Adam and Eve in Genesis, and this passage about children – surely it is God’s will for all of us to go down this path!  Not necessarily.  Earthly marriage is a shadow, a metaphor, for the intimacy of our relationship with Christ.  And the passage above indicates that we should treasure children…not necessarily have them ourselves.  Please be careful that you don’t mix up cultural values and Christian values, and impose them upon yourself, or upon others.

Secondly…invest in the life of younger people, someway, somehow.  There are tutoring programs like ULC or Little Lights.  There are youth groups across this state.  There may be a young cousin or nephew that you have .  But Jesus treasures the young, and so should we.  And in children, we catch a glimpse of the kind of heart we should have as well, a heart that openly and joyfully runs to our Heavenly Father – I guarantee that if you invest in a younger person, you will get more out of it than you receive…

Questions

1. Have you ever believed that it is God’s will for every person to get married and have kids?  Where do you think this belief came from?

2. Have you ever considered that God’s will for your life may NOT be marriage and children?  Why is that such a difficult concept to even consider?

3. Have you ever served young people/children in the past?  What was that experience like?

4. What are some ways you can invest in youth this season?

Posted in: Uncategorized
4 Responses “2.6.09, Mark 10:13-16” →
  1. I’ve heard it said that usually if you have a desire to get married, it’s not God’s will for you to be single. However, my question is, what about those people who want to get married but cannot find a suitable spouse? If you can’t find a spouse, does it mean God doesn’t want you to get married? Or does it mean that you should just look harder? In general, how do people know when they are called to singleness?


  2. peterwchin

    February 8, 2009

    i think that “desire=God’s will” equation is far, far too simplistic. so the first step is to realize that the situation is way too difficult and personal to apply with a broad brush. it’s probably best to throw away platitudes when it comes to this issue.

    one of the compounding problems in this situation is also that our culture makes it feel like EVERYONE has to get married – it comes from our parents, from movies, from TV, from nearly every source imaginable. so it is very difficult to distinguish between wanting to get married because that’s God’s plan, and simply wanting to get married because that’s what you see and hear all day.

    i think the first step to identifying the calling to singleness may be simply…to recognize that singleness is okay! for many people they have never even considered it…or else they joke around about celibacy being a “gift”. once that idea takes root, then a person can more clearly discern if that is the way God has made them, but that first step of acceptance of singleness as an idea is a truly important one…


  3. chomomma

    February 9, 2009

    Doesn’t it state in scripture, that “It is not good that the man should be alone; I will make him an help meet for him” (Gen. 2:18).

    I’m not sure exactly what to interpret it as, but it could easily be construed that God wants all of us to get married. But I have a hard time thinking EVERYONE is called to get married… almost sounds monistic and unfeasible. Perhaps, we all are called to get married but many don’t marry the right people or meet the right person. As much as I am a proponent of everyone getting married, there are just many circumstances where people just aren’t in the environment to get married or have children. But maybe I’m thinking inside the box, and there is always someone for everyone no matter the situation or environment.

    In my case, I’ve seen the blessings that come with single life, but at the same time I feel like I won’t be complete without a family and be put in a situation where love is unconditional (like Jesus’s love for me)


  4. peterwchin

    February 9, 2009

    you can’t create a complete theology of marriage simply from the genesis account, unfortunately. the garden is far too distant and unknown to do that. you have to take into account what Jesus teaches in the gospels, that there are no man and wives in heaven, and what paul teaches in 1 corinthians, that it’s better for a person to remain unmarried so they can live for God alone.

    each person has to judge for their own situation, whether they are called to be married and just haven’t found the right person, or perhaps that is not God’s will for their lives. but it is important that they know that either choice is perfectly acceptable as both could be God’s will…

    lastly, it’s not good to look for unconditional love from family — even the best families will constantly fail in that regard. true unconditional love only comes from God, as we learn in the next devotional, and families are to imitate that love. in other words, you already have unconditional love…even without your own family!

%d bloggers like this: