3.27.09, Mark 14:12-16

Posted on March 27, 2009


The Lord’s Supper

 12On the first day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread, when it was customary to sacrifice the Passover lamb, Jesus’ disciples asked him, “Where do you want us to go and make preparations for you to eat the Passover?” 13So he sent two of his disciples, telling them, “Go into the city, and a man carrying a jar of water will meet you. Follow him. 14Say to the owner of the house he enters, ‘The Teacher asks: Where is my guest room, where I may eat the Passover with my disciples?’ 15He will show you a large upper room, furnished and ready. Make preparations for us there.”

 16The disciples left, went into the city and found things just as Jesus had told them. So they prepared the Passover.

Just As He Had Told Them

Here we are at the Last Supper, which in most of our minds, marks the day of the crucifixion.  But I want to remind us that we have been traveling down this road for a while, haven’t we?  In previous devotionals, time and time again, we saw how Jesus’ attention was focused on the cross, on this enormous work of redemption, even from the very beginning of his ministry.  We’ve seen him take every step, working miracles, teaching, so many wonderful moments, but this…this is what he had come to do.

And this brings us to the main point of today’s devotional – that this momentous day was no accident, and no work of mere man.  Good Friday fell on the same day as the celebration of the Passover, where a lamb was slain in order to save Israel from death.  Even the details seem pre-ordained, how Jesus knows about the room where they will meet, how it seems the room was fully prepared for their arrival.  There is a sense of expectation, and fulfillment.

This was no accident, but showed how this was always God’s plan from the start, that the Passover would actually point forward to the true Lamb – Jesus.  The day fell on the Passover.  All the details were set.  It is a build up to something incredible, and terrible, and eternal: God’s plan for redemption, hinted at in the Old Testament, yearned for by the prophets, was coming to pass.  I think it is important that we sense this as well, that something enormous is about to happen, that all of creation had been yearning for.

Questions

1. Why is it significant that Jesus’ death and resurrection was God’s plan from the very start?

2. How do you feel about the crucifixion?  Is it something important and moving to you still, or has it lost its effect on you to some degree?

3. How can we practically retain our sense of awe and thankfulness about the crucifixion?

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Posted in: Uncategorized
3 Responses “3.27.09, Mark 14:12-16” →

  1. thomas garrett

    March 28, 2009

    Several Questions:

    1. Did Yahshua need to die at the same time as the 14th lamb in order to fulfill being the Passover? Wasn’t the shadow of Isaac and the ram as well as the 14th lamb leading us to the redemption from death made by Yahshua? OOps, that was two.

    2. In the Old Testament account of Passover, how could the Hebrews kill, roast, eat, burn remainder, stay in the house through the night, and leave at night (Deut. 16:1) on the 15th (Num. 33:3)? I do not see how you can fit into one day. It does fit if the Passover is killed on the twilight of 13th into 14th, then stay in home until morning, plunder Egyptians 14th, and leave at night the beginning of 15th.

    Please forgive my ignorance, all I have is the Word to go by. I do appreciate any and all feedback. It is my prayer the the Father guide me to truth on this matter. Thank you for your time. Shalom, Kelli


  2. peterwchin

    March 28, 2009

    hm…good, mysterious questions:

    1. i think in terms of the redemption narrative, Jesus’ death is the center point, even though it comes chronologically after the passover. so in this light, looking at the larger work that God was and is doing, Jesus’ death didn’t fulfill the passover…the passover had to fit with Jesus’ death. so in this way, it is not a huge deal that Jesus died on passover, but it does help us to remember how God’s plan for redemption was fixed from very early on!

    but you are right, the passover is not the only precursor to Jesus’ redemption – there is also the ram provided for isaac; there’s also the curse over the serpent, of one who would be struck on the heel but would crush the serpent’s head; there’s the prophecy of Immanuel of isaiah, and suffering servant. people call this idea proto-evangelism, or very early yet precious hints at the gospel of Jesus that fill the old testament – all of which point forward to the cross.

    2. hm, i’m not really familiar with that issue, so i don’t think i can answer it with any real authority. but to be honest, i have killed, roasted, and eaten a sheep before, and it doesn’t take very long – a couple of hours? but that is just my stupid answer – i think you may want to refer to other resources for a more exact chronology of that time…

    thanks for the question – all any of us have is the Word and the guidance of a good Father, so i think you’ll be fine!


  3. jim rudd

    August 20, 2009

    Dear thomas garrett,
    It is a somewhat common misconception in some chruches that Isreal left egypt by night. Deut. 16: states Israel was brought out by night. If you read all of Deut. there should be no doubt that what brought Isreal out of Egypt was the power of god being shown through the death of the first born.
    So Israel left during the daylight protion of the 15th of Nisan, not be night.

3.27.09, Mark 14:12-16

Posted on March 27, 2009


The Lord’s Supper

 12On the first day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread, when it was customary to sacrifice the Passover lamb, Jesus’ disciples asked him, “Where do you want us to go and make preparations for you to eat the Passover?” 13So he sent two of his disciples, telling them, “Go into the city, and a man carrying a jar of water will meet you. Follow him. 14Say to the owner of the house he enters, ‘The Teacher asks: Where is my guest room, where I may eat the Passover with my disciples?’ 15He will show you a large upper room, furnished and ready. Make preparations for us there.”

 16The disciples left, went into the city and found things just as Jesus had told them. So they prepared the Passover.

Just As He Had Told Them

Here we are at the Last Supper, which in most of our minds, marks the day of the crucifixion.  But I want to remind us that we have been traveling down this road for a while, haven’t we?  In previous devotionals, time and time again, we saw how Jesus’ attention was focused on the cross, on this enormous work of redemption, even from the very beginning of his ministry.  We’ve seen him take every step, working miracles, teaching, so many wonderful moments, but this…this is what he had come to do.

And this brings us to the main point of today’s devotional – that this momentous day was no accident, and no work of mere man.  Good Friday fell on the same day as the celebration of the Passover, where a lamb was slain in order to save Israel from death.  Even the details seem pre-ordained, how Jesus knows about the room where they will meet, how it seems the room was fully prepared for their arrival.  There is a sense of expectation, and fulfillment.

This was no accident, but showed how this was always God’s plan from the start, that the Passover would actually point forward to the true Lamb – Jesus.  The day fell on the Passover.  All the details were set.  It is a build up to something incredible, and terrible, and eternal: God’s plan for redemption, hinted at in the Old Testament, yearned for by the prophets, was coming to pass.  I think it is important that we sense this as well, that something enormous is about to happen, that all of creation had been yearning for.

Questions

1. Why is it significant that Jesus’ death and resurrection was God’s plan from the very start?

2. How do you feel about the crucifixion?  Is it something important and moving to you still, or has it lost its effect on you to some degree?

3. How can we practically retain our sense of awe and thankfulness about the crucifixion?

Posted in: Uncategorized
3 Responses “3.27.09, Mark 14:12-16” →

  1. thomas garrett

    March 28, 2009

    Several Questions:

    1. Did Yahshua need to die at the same time as the 14th lamb in order to fulfill being the Passover? Wasn’t the shadow of Isaac and the ram as well as the 14th lamb leading us to the redemption from death made by Yahshua? OOps, that was two.

    2. In the Old Testament account of Passover, how could the Hebrews kill, roast, eat, burn remainder, stay in the house through the night, and leave at night (Deut. 16:1) on the 15th (Num. 33:3)? I do not see how you can fit into one day. It does fit if the Passover is killed on the twilight of 13th into 14th, then stay in home until morning, plunder Egyptians 14th, and leave at night the beginning of 15th.

    Please forgive my ignorance, all I have is the Word to go by. I do appreciate any and all feedback. It is my prayer the the Father guide me to truth on this matter. Thank you for your time. Shalom, Kelli


  2. peterwchin

    March 28, 2009

    hm…good, mysterious questions:

    1. i think in terms of the redemption narrative, Jesus’ death is the center point, even though it comes chronologically after the passover. so in this light, looking at the larger work that God was and is doing, Jesus’ death didn’t fulfill the passover…the passover had to fit with Jesus’ death. so in this way, it is not a huge deal that Jesus died on passover, but it does help us to remember how God’s plan for redemption was fixed from very early on!

    but you are right, the passover is not the only precursor to Jesus’ redemption – there is also the ram provided for isaac; there’s also the curse over the serpent, of one who would be struck on the heel but would crush the serpent’s head; there’s the prophecy of Immanuel of isaiah, and suffering servant. people call this idea proto-evangelism, or very early yet precious hints at the gospel of Jesus that fill the old testament – all of which point forward to the cross.

    2. hm, i’m not really familiar with that issue, so i don’t think i can answer it with any real authority. but to be honest, i have killed, roasted, and eaten a sheep before, and it doesn’t take very long – a couple of hours? but that is just my stupid answer – i think you may want to refer to other resources for a more exact chronology of that time…

    thanks for the question – all any of us have is the Word and the guidance of a good Father, so i think you’ll be fine!


  3. jim rudd

    August 20, 2009

    Dear thomas garrett,
    It is a somewhat common misconception in some chruches that Isreal left egypt by night. Deut. 16: states Israel was brought out by night. If you read all of Deut. there should be no doubt that what brought Isreal out of Egypt was the power of god being shown through the death of the first born.
    So Israel left during the daylight protion of the 15th of Nisan, not be night.

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